Discussion:
MIL light on, two new codes on my 2000 Sable Vulcan OHV
(too old to reply)
Sam Seagate
2015-02-28 19:57:52 UTC
Permalink
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
Jeff Strickland
2015-02-28 20:40:16 UTC
Permalink
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve, the
engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding codes
PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than checking
fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
http://engine-codes.com/p0135.html
http://engine-codes.com/p0155.html



O2 Sensors have heaters in them so they respond quicker when the engine is
still cold. On Cold Engine Start, the sensors respond slowly to conditions
that exist in the exhaust. On any given car, this does not matter, but on
millions of cars it makes a big difference in emissions. This will not cause
you any problems, except that it will annoy the smog technician.

There could be a blown fuse that is keeping the heaters off. It's unlikely
that both sensors developed the same problem at the same time, therefore
finding a common thread -- like a blown fuse -- is a smart first step.
Jeff Strickland
2015-02-28 20:46:35 UTC
Permalink
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve, the
engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding codes
PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than checking
fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.

P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that produces
it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for example, but the
meaning can be different because the code is defined by the automaker. A P0
code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same because it is defined by
the OBD II conventions.
Sam Seagate
2015-02-28 21:50:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.
P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that
produces it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for
example, but the meaning can be different because the code is defined by
the automaker. A P0 code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same
because it is defined by the OBD II conventions.
Do you know which fuses I should check? In my owner's manual, I am
unable to find any fuses either in car or under hood for the sensors.
Thanks.
Jeff Strickland
2015-02-28 22:31:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.
P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that
produces it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for
example, but the meaning can be different because the code is defined by
the automaker. A P0 code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same
because it is defined by the OBD II conventions.
Do you know which fuses I should check? In my owner's manual, I am unable
to find any fuses either in car or under hood for the sensors. Thanks.
I do not know which fuse you need to locate. There has to be one though. If
the car has a secondary air pump, the same circuit that makes the pump come
on with Cold Engine Start, and remain running for about 2 minutes, is the
circuit that powers the O2 Heaters. The heaters are only on for a couple of
minutes because the hot exhaust will make them hot. The heaters only shorten
the time that the sensors need to work properly. If there was no heater
element built into the sensor, the sensor would eventually be hot from the
exhaust.

You can safely drive this car while you are sorting it out.
Sam Seagate
2015-02-28 22:48:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.
P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that
produces it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for
example, but the meaning can be different because the code is defined by
the automaker. A P0 code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same
because it is defined by the OBD II conventions.
Do you know which fuses I should check? In my owner's manual, I am
unable to find any fuses either in car or under hood for the sensors.
Thanks.
I do not know which fuse you need to locate. There has to be one though.
If the car has a secondary air pump, the same circuit that makes the
pump come on with Cold Engine Start, and remain running for about 2
minutes, is the circuit that powers the O2 Heaters. The heaters are only
on for a couple of minutes because the hot exhaust will make them hot.
The heaters only shorten the time that the sensors need to work
properly. If there was no heater element built into the sensor, the
sensor would eventually be hot from the exhaust.
Alright, I'll take a look at the manual shortly. Thanks. There is one
thing that has occurred to me, however. After I replaced the intake
once I changed the plugs a few weeks back, I did forget to hook up a
small harness that clips to the rear bottom side of the intake on this
car (it's a green sliding clip). In reviewing the video I used to help
me remove the manifold, the mechanic talks about this leading to the O2
sensors; I'll be me not clipping this back onto the manifold bottom has
caused a short somewhere because that harness is just dangling in place.
Post by Jeff Strickland
You can safely drive this car while you are sorting it out.
c***@snyder.on.ca
2015-03-01 04:13:18 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:48:16 -0500, Sam Seagate
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.
P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that
produces it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for
example, but the meaning can be different because the code is defined by
the automaker. A P0 code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same
because it is defined by the OBD II conventions.
Do you know which fuses I should check? In my owner's manual, I am
unable to find any fuses either in car or under hood for the sensors.
Thanks.
I do not know which fuse you need to locate. There has to be one though.
If the car has a secondary air pump, the same circuit that makes the
pump come on with Cold Engine Start, and remain running for about 2
minutes, is the circuit that powers the O2 Heaters. The heaters are only
on for a couple of minutes because the hot exhaust will make them hot.
The heaters only shorten the time that the sensors need to work
properly. If there was no heater element built into the sensor, the
sensor would eventually be hot from the exhaust.
Alright, I'll take a look at the manual shortly. Thanks. There is one
thing that has occurred to me, however. After I replaced the intake
once I changed the plugs a few weeks back, I did forget to hook up a
small harness that clips to the rear bottom side of the intake on this
car (it's a green sliding clip). In reviewing the video I used to help
me remove the manifold, the mechanic talks about this leading to the O2
sensors; I'll be me not clipping this back onto the manifold bottom has
caused a short somewhere because that harness is just dangling in place.
Post by Jeff Strickland
You can safely drive this car while you are sorting it out.
The fuse involved is fuse&28, and I highly doubt the fuse is the
problem because according to the owners manual, that appears to be a
15 amp fuse that covers the following components:

HEGO Sensor, Transmission Shift Solenoid, Canister Vent, A/C Clutch
Relay, Thermactor Bypass Solenoid
If the fuse was bad the tranny wouldn't shift very well either and
he'd be getting an evap code.
Sam Seagate
2015-03-01 11:51:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:48:16 -0500, Sam Seagate
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.
P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that
produces it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for
example, but the meaning can be different because the code is defined by
the automaker. A P0 code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same
because it is defined by the OBD II conventions.
Do you know which fuses I should check? In my owner's manual, I am
unable to find any fuses either in car or under hood for the sensors.
Thanks.
I do not know which fuse you need to locate. There has to be one though.
If the car has a secondary air pump, the same circuit that makes the
pump come on with Cold Engine Start, and remain running for about 2
minutes, is the circuit that powers the O2 Heaters. The heaters are only
on for a couple of minutes because the hot exhaust will make them hot.
The heaters only shorten the time that the sensors need to work
properly. If there was no heater element built into the sensor, the
sensor would eventually be hot from the exhaust.
Alright, I'll take a look at the manual shortly. Thanks. There is one
thing that has occurred to me, however. After I replaced the intake
once I changed the plugs a few weeks back, I did forget to hook up a
small harness that clips to the rear bottom side of the intake on this
car (it's a green sliding clip). In reviewing the video I used to help
me remove the manifold, the mechanic talks about this leading to the O2
sensors; I'll be me not clipping this back onto the manifold bottom has
caused a short somewhere because that harness is just dangling in place.
Post by Jeff Strickland
You can safely drive this car while you are sorting it out.
The fuse involved is fuse&28, and I highly doubt the fuse is the
problem because according to the owners manual, that appears to be a
HEGO Sensor, Transmission Shift Solenoid, Canister Vent, A/C Clutch
Relay, Thermactor Bypass Solenoid
If the fuse was bad the tranny wouldn't shift very well either and
he'd be getting an evap code.
I do also get P1000 code, but I've had that ever since MIL reset 6 weeks
ago. It did not fail inspection with this code.

I'll check that fuse later this morning just in case.

I can find very little, if any, change in terms of how it runs. I know
nobody wants to hear this as I really pushed the issue the last time,
but LTFT still run around +10. STFT do not and stay around 0.

I wish I knew for a fact where these sensors are located. I believe
when I had the manifold off a few weeks ago, one of them was underneath
the manifold between the engine and firewall. Not sure if this was the
upstream sensor or not. I don't have much luck finding diagrams for the
location and I'm also going to need a schematic I would think to check
the voltages if I need to.

Thanks.
Jeff Strickland
2015-03-01 15:54:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:48:16 -0500, Sam Seagate
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.
P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that
produces it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for
example, but the meaning can be different because the code is defined by
the automaker. A P0 code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same
because it is defined by the OBD II conventions.
Do you know which fuses I should check? In my owner's manual, I am
unable to find any fuses either in car or under hood for the sensors.
Thanks.
I do not know which fuse you need to locate. There has to be one though.
If the car has a secondary air pump, the same circuit that makes the
pump come on with Cold Engine Start, and remain running for about 2
minutes, is the circuit that powers the O2 Heaters. The heaters are only
on for a couple of minutes because the hot exhaust will make them hot.
The heaters only shorten the time that the sensors need to work
properly. If there was no heater element built into the sensor, the
sensor would eventually be hot from the exhaust.
Alright, I'll take a look at the manual shortly. Thanks. There is one
thing that has occurred to me, however. After I replaced the intake
once I changed the plugs a few weeks back, I did forget to hook up a
small harness that clips to the rear bottom side of the intake on this
car (it's a green sliding clip). In reviewing the video I used to help
me remove the manifold, the mechanic talks about this leading to the O2
sensors; I'll be me not clipping this back onto the manifold bottom has
caused a short somewhere because that harness is just dangling in place.
Post by Jeff Strickland
You can safely drive this car while you are sorting it out.
The fuse involved is fuse&28, and I highly doubt the fuse is the
problem because according to the owners manual, that appears to be a
HEGO Sensor, Transmission Shift Solenoid, Canister Vent, A/C Clutch
Relay, Thermactor Bypass Solenoid
If the fuse was bad the tranny wouldn't shift very well either and
he'd be getting an evap code.
I do also get P1000 code, but I've had that ever since MIL reset 6 weeks
ago. It did not fail inspection with this code.
I'll check that fuse later this morning just in case.
I can find very little, if any, change in terms of how it runs. I know
nobody wants to hear this as I really pushed the issue the last time, but
LTFT still run around +10. STFT do not and stay around 0.
I wish I knew for a fact where these sensors are located. I believe when
I had the manifold off a few weeks ago, one of them was underneath the
manifold between the engine and firewall. Not sure if this was the
upstream sensor or not. I don't have much luck finding diagrams for the
location and I'm also going to need a schematic I would think to check the
voltages if I need to.
Thanks.
Sam, you must connect the plug that is hanging free. Nothing else matters
until you plug everything back together. The O2 sensors are mounted to the
exhaust system before the CATs. Typically the sensor is located where the
manifold for 3 cylinders comes together. There is a sensor on each bank of
cylinders, and there is a sensor before the CAT and after the CAT. The
sensor before the CAT tells the computer to make small adjustments to the
fuel trim, the sensor after the CAT only detects that what comes out of the
CAT is cleaner than what went in.

Put your hand on the engine. Move your hand along the exhaust system until
you come to an electrical device/connection. This is the upstream O2
Sensor -- it is before the CAT by the direction that the exhaust flows.
Continue to follow the exhaust system over the CAT to the next electrical
device/connection. This is the downstream O2 Sensor -- it is after the CAT
by the direction that the exhaust flows. Some cars can have additional CATs,
and there will be an O2 Sensor after any additional CATs, but I'm pretty
sure your Taurus does not have any additional CATs, so the point is moot. I
only mention it for the possible educational value in telling you that some
cars have more than one CAT per exhaust bank.

The codes you are having, P0135 and P0155 tell you nothing about how well
the sensors work, or do not work, they only tell you that the heater
elements do not work. YOU told us they are not connected -- you left a
connector unplugged -- and the computer does not know unplugged from blown
fuse, so it is all the same to the computer.
Sam Seagate
2015-03-01 16:17:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Sat, 28 Feb 2015 17:48:16 -0500, Sam Seagate
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well, less than 6 weeks after my ordeal with the defective pcb valve,
the engine light came on yet again today. Upon scanning, I am finding
codes PO135 and PO155. I haven't yet done a data record other than
checking fuel trims which are OK. Suggestions?
It's P0, not PO, by the way.
P0 (zero) is a generic code that always means the same thing on all cars
that produce it, P1 is a code that is unique to the automaker that
produces it. The same P1 code can be produced by Ford and BMW, for
example, but the meaning can be different because the code is defined by
the automaker. A P0 code made by a Ford and a BMW would mean the same
because it is defined by the OBD II conventions.
Do you know which fuses I should check? In my owner's manual, I am
unable to find any fuses either in car or under hood for the sensors.
Thanks.
I do not know which fuse you need to locate. There has to be one though.
If the car has a secondary air pump, the same circuit that makes the
pump come on with Cold Engine Start, and remain running for about 2
minutes, is the circuit that powers the O2 Heaters. The heaters are only
on for a couple of minutes because the hot exhaust will make them hot.
The heaters only shorten the time that the sensors need to work
properly. If there was no heater element built into the sensor, the
sensor would eventually be hot from the exhaust.
Alright, I'll take a look at the manual shortly. Thanks. There is one
thing that has occurred to me, however. After I replaced the intake
once I changed the plugs a few weeks back, I did forget to hook up a
small harness that clips to the rear bottom side of the intake on this
car (it's a green sliding clip). In reviewing the video I used to help
me remove the manifold, the mechanic talks about this leading to the O2
sensors; I'll be me not clipping this back onto the manifold bottom has
caused a short somewhere because that harness is just dangling in place.
Post by Jeff Strickland
You can safely drive this car while you are sorting it out.
The fuse involved is fuse&28, and I highly doubt the fuse is the
problem because according to the owners manual, that appears to be a
HEGO Sensor, Transmission Shift Solenoid, Canister Vent, A/C Clutch
Relay, Thermactor Bypass Solenoid
If the fuse was bad the tranny wouldn't shift very well either and
he'd be getting an evap code.
I do also get P1000 code, but I've had that ever since MIL reset 6
weeks ago. It did not fail inspection with this code.
I'll check that fuse later this morning just in case.
I can find very little, if any, change in terms of how it runs. I
know nobody wants to hear this as I really pushed the issue the last
time, but LTFT still run around +10. STFT do not and stay around 0.
I wish I knew for a fact where these sensors are located. I believe
when I had the manifold off a few weeks ago, one of them was
underneath the manifold between the engine and firewall. Not sure if
this was the upstream sensor or not. I don't have much luck finding
diagrams for the location and I'm also going to need a schematic I
would think to check the voltages if I need to.
Thanks.
Sam, you must connect the plug that is hanging free. Nothing else
matters until you plug everything back together. The O2 sensors are
mounted to the exhaust system before the CATs. Typically the sensor is
located where the manifold for 3 cylinders comes together. There is a
sensor on each bank of cylinders, and there is a sensor before the CAT
and after the CAT. The sensor before the CAT tells the computer to make
small adjustments to the fuel trim, the sensor after the CAT only
detects that what comes out of the CAT is cleaner than what went in.
Put your hand on the engine. Move your hand along the exhaust system
until you come to an electrical device/connection. This is the upstream
O2 Sensor -- it is before the CAT by the direction that the exhaust
flows. Continue to follow the exhaust system over the CAT to the next
electrical device/connection. This is the downstream O2 Sensor -- it is
after the CAT by the direction that the exhaust flows. Some cars can
have additional CATs, and there will be an O2 Sensor after any
additional CATs, but I'm pretty sure your Taurus does not have any
additional CATs, so the point is moot. I only mention it for the
possible educational value in telling you that some cars have more than
one CAT per exhaust bank.
The codes you are having, P0135 and P0155 tell you nothing about how
well the sensors work, or do not work, they only tell you that the
heater elements do not work. YOU told us they are not connected -- you
left a connector unplugged -- and the computer does not know unplugged
from blown fuse, so it is all the same to the computer.
Sorry to mislead, Jeff, but they are connected. What I was trying to
say was that there is a plug and socket that I believe goes to the one
O2 sensor, and this plug/socket "clip" to the bottom of the intake
manifold. I did plug them back together when I did the spark plug job a
few weeks back, but what I failed to do was slide the clip back onto the
bottom of the manifold. So there is continuity, yes, I just didn't
reattach the socket/plug combo to the manifold via its clip. So it has
been this combo which has been dangling since I did the job. One of my
suspicions is that since it wasn't reattached to anything to stop
movement, that I now have an open or short in one of the wires. I plan
to reattach this combination under the manifold, maybe replace a fuse,
if one is blown, and reset the codes and see what happens.

I'm trying to follow you regarding sensor location but can I access this
all from under the hood, or do I need to be under the car?

thanks
Jeff Strickland
2015-03-01 19:09:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Seagate
I'm trying to follow you regarding sensor location but can I access this
all from under the hood, or do I need to be under the car?
thanks
Whatever it takes. Open the hood and start from the top and go as far as you
can, then crawl underneath and pick up where you left off. All cars are the
same, so once you learn to identify the parts on your car, the next car
might be a variant with respect to specific location, but it will be the
same from a block diagram view.

The front half of the engine -- your engine is sidways in the engine bay --
is easy to follow, the other side is more difficult, but is still pretty
easy.

When you open the hood and look down, you should see an exhaust manifold
that connects three cylinders. You may or may not have the CAT visible -- on
my BMW, the CATs can be seen easily, but on my F150 I have to get under the
truck to see them -- and there is an O2 Sensor before the CAT and another
one after. Depending on obstructions, you may or may not be able to reach
the stuff you are looking for, and some of it might be blocked from view.

Frankly, if this is difficult then you should give pause to doing your own
service else you risk introducing new problems. I appreciate that you want
to fix your own car, but doing it over the interweb is perhaps not the best
strategy. There is a certain amount of insight that you can only get from a
guy, or gal, standing beside you pointing some of this stuff out. (Fixing
your car is not out of the realm of female capability, so if you have a girl
in your life that knows her way around a car, do not hesitate to ask for
some help.)
Sam Seagate
2015-03-02 10:37:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
I'm trying to follow you regarding sensor location but can I access
this all from under the hood, or do I need to be under the car?
thanks
Whatever it takes. Open the hood and start from the top and go as far as
you can, then crawl underneath and pick up where you left off. All cars
are the same, so once you learn to identify the parts on your car, the
next car might be a variant with respect to specific location, but it
will be the same from a block diagram view.
The front half of the engine -- your engine is sidways in the engine bay
-- is easy to follow, the other side is more difficult, but is still
pretty easy.
When you open the hood and look down, you should see an exhaust manifold
that connects three cylinders. You may or may not have the CAT visible
-- on my BMW, the CATs can be seen easily, but on my F150 I have to get
under the truck to see them -- and there is an O2 Sensor before the CAT
and another one after. Depending on obstructions, you may or may not be
able to reach the stuff you are looking for, and some of it might be
blocked from view.
Frankly, if this is difficult then you should give pause to doing your
own service else you risk introducing new problems. I appreciate that
you want to fix your own car, but doing it over the interweb is perhaps
not the best strategy. There is a certain amount of insight that you can
only get from a guy, or gal, standing beside you pointing some of this
stuff out. (Fixing your car is not out of the realm of female
capability, so if you have a girl in your life that knows her way around
a car, do not hesitate to ask for some help.)
Not that difficult, I just need guidance like that provided here and
other forums. It really is appreciated.

What has made these problems bad for me is that they have all occurred
during Winter and the Winter here has been very bad this year, mainly
with extreme cold. Lacking a garage, all I have is a leaky carport with
poor lighting so I've had to make sure to try working both at the 'heat'
of the day and when lighting is best. If this were Spring/ Summer,
there would have been a lot less issues.

Hopefully, once all the ice build up from yesterday thaws today, I can
start the troubleshooting process. The first thing I want to do is
reclip the sensor wire harness to the holding location on the manifold
and run the fuse tests, then I'll go from there.

Not sure if this was you or someone else, but someone I thought said I
could still drive the car this way, is that correct? Other than the
codes, I don't see any abnormal readings on the scanner and the car
seems to be running ok.

Sam
Sam Seagate
2015-03-02 14:58:02 UTC
Permalink
Well,I think I can stop my troubleshooting as I found the source of the
problem. I suspected me not clipping the 02 sensor plug back onto the
bottom of the manifold was the problem and it definitely is. Dangling
there, the plug came up against something hot and was burned halfway
through. It is a two part plug, green, four wires on each side going to
the O2 sensors. Any idea what part this might be? In a pinch, I might
be able to just clip off the plug on each side and splice the wires
together if I color match them correctly. I can only hope that this
short didn't burn out a sensor. Have yet to check the fuses, but will
do so now with this info.
Jeff Strickland
2015-03-02 16:38:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Seagate
Well,I think I can stop my troubleshooting as I found the source of the
problem. I suspected me not clipping the 02 sensor plug back onto the
bottom of the manifold was the problem and it definitely is. Dangling
there, the plug came up against something hot and was burned halfway
through. It is a two part plug, green, four wires on each side going to
the O2 sensors. Any idea what part this might be? In a pinch, I might be
able to just clip off the plug on each side and splice the wires together
if I color match them correctly. I can only hope that this short didn't
burn out a sensor. Have yet to check the fuses, but will do so now with
this info.
Not likely you burned out the sensor.

One issue with splicing is that the sensor is making millivolts of
electricity at milliamps of current, this means that a defective splice can
disrupt the circuit and prosent you with even more faults.

Since your fuel trim is calculated at least in part from the input from the
sensor(s) and the trims change with the conditions, then it seems that the
delicate part of the sensor is still connected. By the codes you report, it
appears that all you took out is the control to the heater elements. By
shorting the heater control to ground, you removed the heater signal from
the sensor and it does not work. I'm concerned that you cannot identify a
fuse for this circuit, but no matter. If all that's wrong is that the
heaters are not working in the O2 Sensors, then you can safely drive this
car without further damage -- assuming you capture the burned wires and
prevent further damage there.

By having no heaters in the O2 Sensors you only cause them to perform slowly
during the first two or three minutes of engine operation. The problem here
is if that there are millions of cars all performing poorly during this
time, then there is significant pollution being generated.
Sam Seagate
2015-03-02 20:53:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Strickland
Post by Sam Seagate
Well,I think I can stop my troubleshooting as I found the source of
the problem. I suspected me not clipping the 02 sensor plug back onto
the bottom of the manifold was the problem and it definitely is.
Dangling there, the plug came up against something hot and was burned
halfway through. It is a two part plug, green, four wires on each
side going to the O2 sensors. Any idea what part this might be? In a
pinch, I might be able to just clip off the plug on each side and
splice the wires together if I color match them correctly. I can only
hope that this short didn't burn out a sensor. Have yet to check the
fuses, but will do so now with this info.
Not likely you burned out the sensor.
One issue with splicing is that the sensor is making millivolts of
electricity at milliamps of current, this means that a defective splice
can disrupt the circuit and prosent you with even more faults.
Since your fuel trim is calculated at least in part from the input from
the sensor(s) and the trims change with the conditions, then it seems
that the delicate part of the sensor is still connected. By the codes
you report, it appears that all you took out is the control to the
heater elements. By shorting the heater control to ground, you removed
the heater signal from the sensor and it does not work. I'm concerned
that you cannot identify a fuse for this circuit, but no matter. If all
that's wrong is that the heaters are not working in the O2 Sensors, then
you can safely drive this car without further damage -- assuming you
capture the burned wires and prevent further damage there.
By having no heaters in the O2 Sensors you only cause them to perform
slowly during the first two or three minutes of engine operation. The
problem here is if that there are millions of cars all performing poorly
during this time, then there is significant pollution being generated.
So today I cut out the connector and then spliced, soldered, heat
shrinked and finally coated each connection with liquid electrical tape.
I had some difficulty owing to the tight spacing, but did complete the
job. I then tied this wire group to another wiring harness across from
the manifold. Hopefully, that will suffice and no nasty overheating/
burning again.

I rechecked the fuse that Clare mentioned but it was good.

Driving cycle completed shortly afterward and no MIL light.

Hopefully this is solved now.
c***@snyder.on.ca
2015-03-02 22:37:19 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 02 Mar 2015 09:58:02 -0500, Sam Seagate
Post by Sam Seagate
Well,I think I can stop my troubleshooting as I found the source of the
problem. I suspected me not clipping the 02 sensor plug back onto the
bottom of the manifold was the problem and it definitely is. Dangling
there, the plug came up against something hot and was burned halfway
through. It is a two part plug, green, four wires on each side going to
the O2 sensors. Any idea what part this might be? In a pinch, I might
be able to just clip off the plug on each side and splice the wires
together if I color match them correctly. I can only hope that this
short didn't burn out a sensor. Have yet to check the fuses, but will
do so now with this info.
Do yourself a favor and go to a wrecking yard - a u-pull-it would be
best, and buy the plug from a wreck of the same year and model - make
suere the connector is green because there are more than one style of
sensor/plug used on early 2000s Taurus and Sable and the plugs are not
interchangeable. Remove the damaged plug and replace with the one from
the wreckers. Solder and shrink tube the joint, then tape over that.
Plug the O2 sensor into the new plug.
Sam Seagate
2015-03-03 10:31:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@snyder.on.ca
On Mon, 02 Mar 2015 09:58:02 -0500, Sam Seagate
Post by Sam Seagate
Well,I think I can stop my troubleshooting as I found the source of the
problem. I suspected me not clipping the 02 sensor plug back onto the
bottom of the manifold was the problem and it definitely is. Dangling
there, the plug came up against something hot and was burned halfway
through. It is a two part plug, green, four wires on each side going to
the O2 sensors. Any idea what part this might be? In a pinch, I might
be able to just clip off the plug on each side and splice the wires
together if I color match them correctly. I can only hope that this
short didn't burn out a sensor. Have yet to check the fuses, but will
do so now with this info.
Do yourself a favor and go to a wrecking yard - a u-pull-it would be
best, and buy the plug from a wreck of the same year and model - make
suere the connector is green because there are more than one style of
sensor/plug used on early 2000s Taurus and Sable and the plugs are not
interchangeable. Remove the damaged plug and replace with the one from
the wreckers. Solder and shrink tube the joint, then tape over that.
Plug the O2 sensor into the new plug.
In retrospect, a U Pull It would have been ideal but there isn't one
closer than 50 mi from me. The last one closed about 15 years ago.

I ran into the issue you mentioned when trying to order it online. I
couldn't find the 'green' one and since it was melted on both sides, I
probably would have had to cut off and replace the plug completely on
the sensor side too. Rockauto, for example, had a brown connector on
the harness side but no plug separately available on the sensor side.
So a yard would have been best had one still been around.

Well, I think what I did worked out. I've never been a big fan of
splicing where a connector was originally present, but if done correctly
and thoroughly, 99% of the time it should suffice or at least I hope.
Since the batt was unhooked while I did the splices, MIL reset and then
I did a couple of driving cycles yesterday. No MIL after one deliberate
cycle and then an additional 60 mi of driving. Hopefully problem solved.
Jeff Strickland
2015-03-01 15:40:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Seagate
Alright, I'll take a look at the manual shortly. Thanks. There is one
thing that has occurred to me, however. After I replaced the intake once
I changed the plugs a few weeks back, I did forget to hook up a small
harness that clips to the rear bottom side of the intake on this car (it's
a green sliding clip). In reviewing the video I used to help me remove
the manifold, the mechanic talks about this leading to the O2 sensors;
I'll be me not clipping this back onto the manifold bottom has caused a
short somewhere because that harness is just dangling in place.
Leaving the plug disconnected could easily be the trouble. But it isn't a
short, it's an open. If the connector leads to the O2 sensors, AND it is the
power to them, then the fault conditions would be that the heaters do not
turn on. A connector that is unplugged is the same as a fuse that's blown.
You might not find any blown fuses because the problem is really an
unplugged connector.
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